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Outdoor Decoration Cleator

The beautiful new urns on your deck or patio were a sight to behold this summer in Cleator. But now that the colder weather is setting in, do you need to unplant them and store them out of sight where no one can enjoy them? The answer is no: Here are few tips for using outdoor accessories indoors.

Stewarts Lighting
01900 603542
29 Oxford Street
Workington
 
Lime Lighting Electrical Supplies
01900 821822
Station Road
Cockermouth
 
Nixons Of Maryport
01900 812178
38 Curzon Street
Maryport
 
Bennets Lighting
01229 433884
20 Duke Street
Barrow in Furness
 
Lighthouse
01229 587710
5 Theatre Street
Ulverston
 
Lime Lighting Ltd
01900 822480
Grand Theatre
Cockermouth
 
R Hannah & Co
01900 821822
The Grand Theatre
 
The Light House
017687 71131
7 St Johns Street
Keswick
 
Lakeland Lighting
01539 821096
Gravel House
Kendal
 
AMANDA BARTON INTERIORS AND FURNITURE
01661 844744
THE JIGGERY POKERY SHOP
Stocksfield
 

Outdoor Decoration

Decorating Tip: Adapt your outdoor accessories

The beautiful new urns on your deck or patio were a sight to behold this summer. But now that the colder weather is setting in, do you need to unplant them and store them out of sight where no one can enjoy them?

The answer is no: Here are few tips for using outdoor accessories indoors.

- Small birdbaths can be used in many creative ways. Filled with seasonal fruit or colourful vegetables, they become unusual, edible, not to mention economical, centrepieces.

- Keep an interesting large urn or planter by your door to catch umbrellas or gloves, mittens, hats or other winter belongings tossed by your kids as they race into the house.

- Fill a container or small birdbath with unusual gourds and small pumpkins. Weathered terracotta, cast stone or rusted iron are natural complements to autumn decorating.

-- ARA Content

How to paint the interior of your home

By following a few simple tips, you'll maximize your time and efforts, while ensuring the end result will look as if you hired a costly professional.

- The most important step to getting a great look is preparation. As a general rule, walls should be clean, dry and dull.

- A base coat of primer should always be used to protect bare, unfinished drywall. Walls that were previously painted can also benefit from a primer if they're stained, previously painted with a dark colour, or in general disrepair.

- Choose high-quality paint, brushes and rollers. Using these items always saves you time and money in the long run.

- Have a painting strategy. The ceiling should be painted first, followed by the walls, then the trim, doors and windows, and lastly the floorboards.

- Apply two coats of paint. Don't rush the process by applying a second coat too soon.

-- ARAcontent

Did You Know …

You can lengthen the life of fresh-cut flowers by adding six or seven drops of bleach to a litre of water. Cut off the stems first to expose a fresh surface.
 
Home Improvements: Kitchen updates on a budget

- If you have a small budget and want to make a big impact, wall colour will do it. For the cost of a few gallons of paint, you can easily change the look and feel of your kitchen.

- Tired looking cabinets can easily be brought back to life with a coat of primer and paint, and so can dated cabinet hardware. If you're willing to use a little elbow grease and purchase an inexpensive can of spray paint, you can transform any handle or knob.

- Replacing an old, scratched sink is easier and cheaper than you might think. While real porcelain might be out of your price range, many stainless steel and acrylic options can be purchased for less than £100.

- Changing out old ceiling fans and light covers, as well as adding colourful and fun kitchen lamps can help pull your new look together and unify your design.

-- ARA content

Backyard Buddies

To keep birds safe at your feeders, place the feeders in locations that do not provide hiding places for cats and other predators. Place feeders 10 to 12 feet from low shrubs or brush piles.

-- National Wildlife Federation

GateHouse News Service