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Splicing Options for Masonry Construction St Bees

The primary components of a reinforced masonry system in St Bees are the masonry units, grout, mortar, and reinforcement. The masonry units, grout, and mortar resist compressive stresses. Generally, the reinforcement (horizontal and vertical) protects against only tension stresses.

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Splicing Options for Masonry Construction

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Source: MASONRY CONSTRUCTION MAGAZINE
Publication date: January 1, 2007

By Jack Healy, P.E.

The primary components of a reinforced masonry system are the masonry units, grout, mortar, and reinforcement. The masonry units, grout, and mortar resist compressive stresses. Generally, the reinforcement (horizontal and vertical) protects against only tension stresses. However, confinement can be added to make the reinforcement also resist compressive stresses.

Reinforcement is installed as the masonry is constructed. Splices are required to provide continuity in the reinforcement.

Traditionally, reinforcement uses lap splices. However, the code-required lengths have steadily increased because of research studying the performance of lap splices. Increased lap lengths affect constructability as well as cost, particularly for low-lift construction which relies heavily on splices. Additionally, the International Building Code (IBC) does not allow lap splices for bars larger than No. 9. Therefore, masonry contractors need to be aware of other splicing options available.

This article discusses lap slices and mechanical splices and offers a method for cost comparison that contractors may refer to when developing data for specific applications. Welded splices are another option, but are not included because of their specialty nature.

Lap splices

Lap splices are constructed by overlapping the reinforcement and encasing them in grout.

Click here to read full article from Masonry Construction